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Tanya Caldwell

Professor
Education

Ph.D., University of Toronto

Specializations

Restoration Literature & Eighteenth-Century British Literature, Drama, Memoir & Auto/Biography

Biography

Dr. Caldwell teaches courses in late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literature. She is particularly interested in the drama and poetry of this period.   Using feedback from her fine graduate students, she completed for Broadview Press an anthology of popular plays by women in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. She is also interested in life writing (autobiography, biography, and memoirs) and regularly offers a graduate course called “Memory and Writing: Auto/Biography and Memoir.”  She enjoys teaching a wide variety of undergraduate courses. She recently taught one of the COAS pilot Spring Break courses, “Literary Dublin.” The great work of the students can be seen here:
literarydublin.blogspot.com

Dr. Caldwell’s research focused for a long time on Dryden and the classics in translation.  She has now shifted her attention more fully to drama and life writing, in particular the late-eighteenth-century playwright Hannah Cowley.  She is currently working on a critical biography of Cowley (1743-1809) as well as articles on the concept of self in the eighteenth century and on translation. Her newest work highlights the importance of Hannah Cowley as playwright and astute business woman in the late eighteenth-century and provides a glimpse of the biography underway.

Dr. Caldwell is also passionate about the international programs in the COAS. She coordinates the highly successful exchange program for English and History majors with the University of Northumbria, Newcastle.  Please see this link:
http://english.gsu.edu/northumbria-undergraduate-exchange-program/

Publications

CaldwellBook3 CaldwellBook2 CaldwellBook1

Books:

Popular Plays by Women in the Restoration and Eighteenth Century.  Ed. Tanya Caldwell. 270pp.  Broadview Press, 2011.

Virgil Made English: The Decline of Classical Authority.  Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.  252pp.

Time to Begin Anew: Dryden’s Georgics and Aeneis.  Bucknell University Press, 2000.  263pp.

Articles:

“’ A City graced with many a dome’: Hannah Cowley’s domestic comedies, the georgic impulse, and the female arts.” 35pp. Accepted for publication in Eighteenth-Century Life. Forthcoming, 2015.

“Translation and Imitation in the Long Eighteenth Century.” In The Oxford Handbook of British Poetry, 1660-1800. Ed. Jack Lynch. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Forthcoming, 2015. 30pp. MS revised and submitted. Under contract awaiting publication.

“Translation, Critical theory of.” In The Encyclopedia of British Literature 1660–1789. Eds. Gary Day and Jack Lynch. Wiley-Blackwell. 2014. 10pp. Copy edited MS submitted.
http://www.literatureencyclopedia.com/public/british_list_of_entries#t

“Neoclassicism in Literature.” In The Virgil Encyclopedia. First edition. Ed. Richard F. Thomas and Jan Ziolkowski. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2014. 892-93.

“Hannah Cowley: the dilemma of the female playwright, and the pseudonymous prelude to Which is the Man?,” Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Theatre Research 27.1 (2013): 25-54.

“’Sacred Bonds of Amity’: Dryden and Male Friendship,” University of Toronto Quarterly 80.2 (2011): 24-49.

“Restoration Parodies of Virgil and English Literary Values,” Huntington Library Quarterly 69.3 (2006): 383-403.

“Meanings of All for Love, 1672-1813,” Comparative Drama 38 (2004): 183-211.

“John Dryden and John Denham.” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 46.1 (2004): 49-72.

“Sure Instinct: Incest, Politics, and Genre in Dryden and Defoe.” Genre 33.1(2000): 27-48.

“Thomas Tyrwhitt” in Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press.

“Talking too much English: The Language of Politics and Economy in Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative.” Early American Literature 34.3 (1999): 263-82.

“Amendments to the Magna Charta: Genre and Dryden’s Aeneis.” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 39.1 (1998): 44-62.

“Dryden’s Sixth Satire of Juvenal and the Sexual Politics of Monarchy,” Philological Quarterly 75.1 (1996): 23-41.

“Honey and Venom: Dryden’s Third Georgic,” Eighteenth-Century Life 20.3(1996): 20-36.